Health and Wellbeing

 

Advice from Fellow Undocumented Students

Ask Angy YouTube Channel

Born in 2010, Ask Angy is the first undocumented youth advice column. It began in the New York State Youth Leadership Council because there was no space to ask questions or seek advice. Ask Angy is a serious but often light-hearted video blog that deals with everyday life of being undocumented in New York City, but extends to issues countrywide. This blog is a space for youth to email their concerns, questions, stories or simply ask for help without being judged. Email them to Angy at Angy@nysylc.org. Angy openly and honestly discusses serious issues like future uncertainty, deferred action and interviewing for jobs as an undocumented individual.

Novoa, Monica. “Beyond Politics: How Undocumented Youth Can Find Emotional Support.” Colorlines, December 2011.

“There is not an undocumented person or ally, family member or loved one that has not witnessed or experienced the effects that systematic dehumanization and alienation can have on the body, mind and spirit…. Given the seriousness of the situation, we sought out friends and experts to spread the word about mental health awareness, and support. We are thankful to our friend Sonia Guinansaca at the New York State Youth Leadership Council, for her candid and heartfelt testimony. And we also spoke with Chicago-based social worker Jacqueline Luna, an ally who supports young people organizing via the Immigrant Youth Justice League (IYJL) and the The National Immigrant Youth Alliance (NIYA).”

 

Access to Service Providers

Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center: ______________

They work exclusively with youth.  They are located in Manhattan and have therapists who speak Spanish.  They also have doctors and dentists. All of their services are free, including for people who do not qualify for Medicaid.  Phone: 212-423-3000

Mount Sinai Sexual Assault and Violence Intervention Program – They work with survivors of sexaul assault and domestic violence.  They have multiple locations in Manhattan and Queens. Therapists speak Spanish, French, Gujarati, Hebrew, Hindi, and Portuguese.  Some languages are not available at all of their locations. They are free, including for people who do not qualify for Medicaid. Phone: 212-423-2140 (Manhattan), 718-736-1288 (Queens)

Sanctuary for Families– They work with survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault and define these terms broadly.  They also work with children who have witnessed these events in their families. They are located in Lower Manhattan.  They have a children’s program, a teen program, and an African Domestic Violence Initiative. They have therapists who speak French, Spanish, and other languages.  They are free, including for people who do not qualify for Medicaid. However, they may have a wait list. Phone: 212-349-6009

Metropolitan Hospital– They have departments for general adolescent counseling and for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault.  They are located in upper Manhattan and are free, including for people who do not qualify for Medicaid. Phone: 212-423-6945 (if under 18), 212-423-6634 (if over 18)

The Door– They work exclusively with youth.  Most services are free, including for people who do not qualify for Medicaid.  They have therapy, counseling, and college advisement services. Phone: 212-941-9090

CAMBA– They have counseling for survivors of sexual assault and domestic violence and general counseling.  They are a large organization with multiple locations in Brooklyn. They have counselors that speak French and specialize in working with the Caribbean community.  They are free, including for people who do not qualify for Medicaid. Phone: 718-287-2600

Immigrant Eligibility for Healthcare in New York– New York Immigration Coalition

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